The Victorian Seamstress

A collection of antique patterns, sundries, garments and details for costume reference & Steampunk inspiration
costumehistory:

andwomenworebloomers:

 Lady in a Picture Hat

A picture hat is a large, broad-brimmed hat, usually rather elaborately trimmed.
The name is usually said to come from the way the hat frames the face, like a round picture frame, though I’ve also seen it said that it is because they were considered a revival of historical styles, so the wearer looked like a the women in the paintings of Gainsborough or Reynolds.  Perhaps the real truth is slightly more prosaic, and it is simply that they were worn by those who affected the picturesque. 
(source)


Probably 1890s-1900s

costumehistory:

andwomenworebloomers:

 Lady in a Picture Hat

A picture hat is a large, broad-brimmed hat, usually rather elaborately trimmed.

The name is usually said to come from the way the hat frames the face, like a round picture frame, though I’ve also seen it said that it is because they were considered a revival of historical styles, so the wearer looked like a the women in the paintings of Gainsborough or Reynolds.  Perhaps the real truth is slightly more prosaic, and it is simply that they were worn by those who affected the picturesque.

(source)

Probably 1890s-1900s

fashionsfromhistory:

Dress
1870s

This dress was remade from a Japanese kimono in London. Some traces of the original kimono seams remain in the textile. The underskirt is missing, but it is thought that an underskirt made of a different fabric was combined with this garment. There are some other indications of missing original ornaments. In the late 19th century kimonos and textiles from Japan captured of the interest of many people in Western countries. Women in America and Europe made dresses from Japanese kimono fabrics and sometimes unstitched kimonos to make new dresses. They also wore kimonos as indoor wear. They especially favored kimonos for women in the highly ranked warrior families at the end of the Edo Period, like the source material for this dress.

KCI

fashionsfromhistory:

Dress

1870s

This dress was remade from a Japanese kimono in London. Some traces of the original kimono seams remain in the textile. The underskirt is missing, but it is thought that an underskirt made of a different fabric was combined with this garment. There are some other indications of missing original ornaments. In the late 19th century kimonos and textiles from Japan captured of the interest of many people in Western countries. Women in America and Europe made dresses from Japanese kimono fabrics and sometimes unstitched kimonos to make new dresses. They also wore kimonos as indoor wear. They especially favored kimonos for women in the highly ranked warrior families at the end of the Edo Period, like the source material for this dress.

KCI

(via fashionsfromhistory)

past-imperfect:

Skull Stick Pin

Paris,1867

Gold and enamel with diamond sparks

The jewel contains electric terminals so that, when connected to a battery concealed in the wearer’s pocket, the eyes roll and the jaws snap.

(via costumehistory)

realhistoricalpatterns:

Here’s a collapsible bustle design from 1888! While it may look complicated at first glance, if you examine each figure one by one, it does seem logistically possible to reconstruct.

Hand-snagged for your pleasure from Google’s digital US patent archives. Please mind the page order, as sometimes Tumblr likes shifting them about!

(via costumehistory)